The Tudor Choir Book, Vol I – Review by RSCM (Church Music Quarterly)

“Well sung and sensitively accompanied”

29th June 2021

The Tudor Choir Book, Vol I – Review by RSCM (Church Music Quarterly)

Listen or buy this album:

The Tudor Choir Book, Vol I – Review by RSCM (Church Music Quarterly)

“Well sung and sensitively accompanied”

29th June 2021

The Tudor Choir Book

Listen or buy this album:

This recording of music is a mixed bag. The performances are spirited, with good tempi and clear diction. What the choir may lack in finesse it certainly makes up for in enthusiasm and commitment. Some pieces are close to perfection: an anonymous setting of Psalm 77, I with my voice to God do cry, and Tallis’s third mode setting of Psalm 2, Why fum’th in fight, are well sung and sensitively accompanied by the English Cornett & Sackbut Ensemble. Peter Philips’s Bow down thine ear, the only a cappella item on this disc, is absolutely beautiful. On the other hand, the Credo movement of the Short Communion Service by Adrian Batten seems slightly hurried. The 21 trebles do themselves and their director proud, giving fine, committed performances, despite the intonation suffering in a few places, most notably Nathaniel Giles’s God, which as on this day.

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This recording of music is a mixed bag. The performances are spirited, with good tempi and clear diction. What the choir may lack in finesse it certainly makes up for in enthusiasm and commitment. Some pieces are close to perfection: an anonymous setting of Psalm 77, I with my voice to God do cry, and Tallis’s third mode setting of Psalm 2, Why fum’th in fight, are well sung and sensitively accompanied by the English Cornett & Sackbut Ensemble. Peter Philips’s Bow down thine ear, the only a cappella item on this disc, is absolutely beautiful. On the other hand, the Credo movement of the Short Communion Service by Adrian Batten seems slightly hurried. The 21 trebles do themselves and their director proud, giving fine, committed performances, despite the intonation suffering in a few places, most notably Nathaniel Giles’s God, which as on this day.

Review written by:

Review published in:

Other reviews by this author:

Featured artists:

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