Dan Locklair: Requiem – Review by Choir & Organ

“Dan Locklair’s is a highly personal Requiem, dedicated to his parents and clearly evolved over many years” ★★★★

14th May 2022

Dan Locklair: Requiem – Review by Choir & Organ

Listen or buy this album:

Dan Locklair: Requiem – Review by Choir & Organ

“Dan Locklair’s is a highly personal Requiem, dedicated to his parents and clearly evolved over many years” ★★★★

14th May 2022

Listen or buy this album:

Dan Locklair’s is a highly personal Requiem, dedicated to his parents and clearly evolved over many years. The non-traditional elements – ‘Let Not Your Heart Be Troubled’, ‘I Am The Resurrection’ and ‘I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes’ – sound as if they might easily be performed separately, but Rupert Gough’s tight control of the chorus, excellent soloists and string orchestra brings the piece together. Whether the other choral works represented belong on the same disc is to be questioned. This is a work, originally written with just organ accompaniment, which deserves to be heard alone and allowed to sink in. The divisi are not complex for the sake of complexity, but help suggest how nuanced and slow-turning relationships with mother and father often are, both in the private and in the sacred realm.

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Dan Locklair’s is a highly personal Requiem, dedicated to his parents and clearly evolved over many years. The non-traditional elements – ‘Let Not Your Heart Be Troubled’, ‘I Am The Resurrection’ and ‘I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes’ – sound as if they might easily be performed separately, but Rupert Gough’s tight control of the chorus, excellent soloists and string orchestra brings the piece together. Whether the other choral works represented belong on the same disc is to be questioned. This is a work, originally written with just organ accompaniment, which deserves to be heard alone and allowed to sink in. The divisi are not complex for the sake of complexity, but help suggest how nuanced and slow-turning relationships with mother and father often are, both in the private and in the sacred realm.

Review written by:

Review published in:

Other reviews by this author:

Featured artists:

Featured composers: